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Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path: North Wales, Anglesey, Llyn peninsula, Snowdonia and Ceredigion Coast, Pembrokeshire, Carmarthen Bay and Gower, and the South Wales Coast.

Short circular walks in UK National Parks. Top 10 walks series: Lake District walks, Peak District walks, Yorkshire Dales walks, Snowdonia walks, Wales Coast Path walks, Pembrokeshire walks, Cheshire and Wirral walks, South West Coast Path walks, Dorset walks, Devon walks, Cornwall walks, Somerset walks.

  • The Official Guide to the Isle of Anglesey/Ynys Mon Coastal Path New Edition - rewalked and wholly updated 2018 The route is described in a clockwise direction, starting and finishing at Holyhead. The 130 mile/210km long Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path passes through some of the grandest coastal scenery in Wales — wide sandy bays and estuaries, intimate coves, dramatic cliffs and rocky islets, sand dunes and forests—much of it designated ‘An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). This Official Guide has been designed to provide all the information needed to plan and walk the coastal path and includes:
    • Information on accommodation, public transport, seasonal closures and tidal restrictions
    • Twelve day-walk chapter sections with detailed route descriptions and full Ordnance Survey mapping
    • Fascinating notes on points of interest
  • NEW, updated and revised edition - 2021 One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The 186 mile/300km long Pembrokeshire section of the Wales Coast Path runs through some of Wales’ most varied and dramatic coastal scenery — high, rugged cliffs and long sandy bays, Pembroke Castle, St David’s cathedral and St Govan’s remote cliff-wrapped chapel, with several large offshore islands. Pembrokeshire is also Britain’s only coastal National Park. This Official Guide splits the route into 14 convenient day sections, each of about 10-17 miles / 16-27 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.
  • NEW, updated and revised edition - 2021 One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The Carmarthen Bay and Gower section of the Wales Coast Path runs for 120 miles/193 kilometres between Amroth, on the eastern edge of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, to Swansea, on the landward side of the Gower Peninsula. This Official Guide splits the route into 12 convenient day sections, each of about 10-17 miles / 16-27 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path and includes: An overview of Carmarthen Bay and Gower with dedicated history and wildlife sections Twelve day-walk sections with detailed route descriptions and full, enhanced Ordnance Survey mapping Distance charts, section overviews, background information and interpretation of places of interest Stunning professional photographs throughout Information on accommodation, public transport, local information, weather, and tidal links.
  • NEW, updated and revised edition – 2022 One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The Snowdonia & Ceredigion coast offers a tremendous variety of landscape to those who walk its entire 132 miles/213 kilometres: from high, airy cliff-tops to secluded coves; from estuarine salt marshes to beaches backed by tremendous dune systems that stretch on for miles. And with that diversity comes a huge range of wildlife, including seabirds, choughs, dolphins and rare wildflowers. The history too changes with every twist and turn of this fascinating route: visitors should always be prepared for the unexpected in a region that contains the ruins of once mighty castles and has links with characters as disparate as King Arthur and members of the rock band Led Zeppelin.
  • NEW - 4th edition updated and revised – 2023 This Official Guide to the Llŷn Peninsula section of the Wales Coast Path contains everything local and long-distance walkers need. The Llŷn offers some of the finest coastal walking in North Wales. Its distinctive landscape is characterised by traditional farms, compact villages and volcanic hills encircled by the ever-present sea. Along the way, you'll pass Iron Age hillforts, pilgrims' churches, medieval castles, a hidden valley, a pub on the beach, tiny coves, sandy bays and Bardsey island balanced at the tip of this ancient 'Land's End of Wales'. Keep an eye out, too, for seabirds, wild goats, choughs, seals, dolphins, wildflowers and butterflies. The Llŷn coast path really is a walkers' paradise.  
  • One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The 115 mile/185km long South Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path runs through unexpectedly varied and dramatic coastal scenery. Along the way are four National Nature Reserves and some 14 miles of designated Heritage Coast, while the deserted salt marshes and mudflats bordering the later stages of the route alongside the mouth of the River Severn are a bird-watchers' paradise. This Official Guide splits the route into nine achievable day sections, each of about 10-17 miles / 16-27 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.
  • New Edition - rewalked and updated 2022 One of seven Official Guides to the Wales Coast Path The 80 mile/125km long North Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path between Chester and Bangor runs alongside the broad Dee Estuary and traditional seaside towns past Conwy Castle, the Great Orme, Penmaenmawr and Conwy Mountain to the university town of Bangor on the Menai Strait. This Official Guide splits the route into 8 convenient day sections, each of about 9-12 miles / 14-20 kilometres. It contains everything local and long-distance walkers need to enjoy the path.
  • This handy little guide book gives you the ten very best short circular walks along the Llŷn peninsula section of the Wales Coast Path The Llŷn pushes 30 miles into the Irish Sea, tipped by the holy isle of Bardsey, or Ynys Enlli ­­— ‘the island of 20,000 saints’. This remote and unspoilt landscape is characterised by traditional farms and compact villages, punctuated by volcanic hills. Its relative isolation has made it a haven for the Welsh language and culture. Sea cliffs, offshore rocks and intimate coves dominate the northern coast, while the gentler southern coast promises sandy beaches and holiday towns like Abersoch and Pwllheli. But for sheer beauty, tranquillity and wildlife, the Llŷn is hard to beat.
  • This handy pocket size book will take you on short circular walks to the ten best pubs in the Peak District. Ever since rambling became a recognised pastime, country pubs have been magnets for walkers. Whether a lunch-time stop along the way or a final destination for the day, the promise of a thirst-quenching pint or a hearty meal are, for many, an integral part of the day. Many of Peakland’s inns have their origins in serving the jaggers and stockmen who travelled the lonely upland routes. Today, they serve not only the locals but also the growing influx of recreational visitors. Long live the Peak District pub.
  • When it comes to hill walking, walks with views are much more fun than those without. These walks will also take keen photographers to come of the best places in Cumbria for taking those stunning images. Viewpoints are the walkers reward: the potential grandeur of the vista or panorama from just over the next incline or the atop the next crag is the incentive that draws on weary legs to summits. With lakes, rivers, forests, woodland, rolling countryside and craggy fells all crammed into such a compact geographical area, it’s no surprise that the Lake District is full of such stunning visual rewards, with unique and beautiful views around every corner.
  •   Even the Peak District's name conceals a mystery. Forget the obvious: a visitor expecting towering peaks will be disappointed, as the name comes from the Pecsaetan tribe who once lived here. But there’s a twist: the Anglo-Saxon means “settlers of the Pec”…and that word pec has the same root as our peak, the dialect pike and the Pyrenean pic. So, ultimately, the Peak District is named after its peaks, after all. The Peak District is broadly defined by the conurbations at its corners: Manchester, Sheffield, Derby and Stoke. Within this rectangle, the National Park forms a rough oval of around 550 square miles. The area is traditionally divided into the Dark Peak – peat moorland edged by gritstone, with rugged villages in the valleys — and the softer White Peak - upland pastures defined by drystone walls, divided by gorges and limestone villages. The eastern and western moors are similar to the Dark Peak, but have their own subtly distinctive characters. The Peak District was occupied by humans long before the Pecsaetans and in each era man has left his mark, from prehistoric standing stones and rock art, through the folk legends, crosses and churches of the Middle Ages, to post-medieval follies and puzzling relics of the extraction of lime and lead. The varied geology of the area throws up natural curiosities too: its dark gritstone has wind-sculpted tors and edges, while its gleaming limestone hides caves and subterranean rivers. This handy pocket size book will take you on short circular walks to the ten most fascinating, odd or strange places in the Peak District. Prepare to be amazed and surprised.  
  • This attractive and good looking book will take you on ten short circular walks to some of the finest and most iconic pubs and inns in Pembrokeshire, in South Wales. Ever since rambling became a recognised pastime, country pubs have been magnets for walkers. Whether a lunchtime stop along the way or a final destination for the day, the promise of a thirst-quenching pint, bar snack or a hearty meal is for many, an integral part of the day. Many of Pembrokeshire's coastal inns have origins in serving seafarers, while those inland lay beside routes to and from the coast or beside old droves along which livestock were herded to market. Today, all have a fine tradition of serving visitors who come for no other purpose than to enjoy the magnificent countryside. Those chosen here have long established reputations for their food or ale and have an individual quirkiness worth seeking out.
  • Coastal Walks around Anglesey contains 22 easy, circular walks that sample just about everything the island’s coastline has to offer. The routes have been chosen with all walkers in mind – from those looking for a casual half-day walk to add variety to a holiday, to the more ambitious who may complete two or more routes, perhaps as a less strenuous alternative to Snowdonia.
  • New, revised edition of the official guide to Cheshire’s Sandstone Trail – probably the most popular middle-distance walk in Northwest England. The Trail runs for 55 kilometres/34 miles along Cheshire’s beautiful and varied central sandstone ridge between Frodsham, on the Mersey Estuary in the north, and Whitchurch, just over the border in Shropshire, in the south. Along the way you'll pass two castles, some amazing views, black-and-white country pubs, a vast ancient forest, canals and pretty rural villages. Plus plenty of wildlife. What more could you want? Compiled and tested by seasoned walkers and local experts, this comprehensive, full colour guide is the perfect companion for weekend strollers and dedicated long-distance walkers alike.
  • Coming Soon
    This lovely little book explores the ten best short circular walks along the southern part of the Pembrokeshire coast — itself part of the Wales Coast Path. The Pembrokeshire coast alters subtly from north to south. The southern rocks are far younger and the coast tends to be south-facing, too, creating a gentler hinterland. This influenced historical development and culture, for although the Norman advance extended throughout Pembrokeshire, settlement focused on the more fertile southern corner. It became known as ‘Little England’, with English rather than Welsh spoken, a tradition reflected in place names. Before reliable roads, trade and prosperity favoured the coast, and because the railways came late here, Pembrokeshire was largely ignored by the Industrial Revolution. Unspoiled and breathtakingly scenic, the coast is captivating every step of the way.
  • This photogenic book will take you on ten short circular walks along the northern part of the Pembrokeshire section of the Wales Coast Path. Pembrokeshire’s north coast has a rugged and remote quality, reflecting the wildness of the hills that rise behind. It was largely ignored during the Norman colonisation and even today beyond St Dogmael’s there are only a handful of coastal communities. Yet burial cairns, promontory forts and a pre-historic trackway across the Preseli Hills indicate widespread prehistoric settlement, and it was an important focus during the spread of Celtic Christianity. Fishing, farming and stock grazing were traditional ways of life, but the Industrial Revolution briefly opened coastal quarrying and the railway made Fishguard an important Irish port. Today, it is a relative backwater but the coast has an untamed beauty, its flowers, birds, seals and porpoises making it a truly special place.
  • This pocket size book explores the ten best short circular waterside walks in the Peak District. Some follow lovely stretches of rivers; others explore the northern reservoirs. Several major rivers originate in the Peak, fed by countless springs, brooks and streams that have cut deep cloughs and gorges through the grit and limestone. Many powered the early industrialisation of the area while the valleys often served as conduits for trans-Pennine trade. Other dales, too steep or narrow for settlement or farming, or whose streams found subterranean courses, were ignored and today provide valuable wildlife habitats. And although the region has no significant natural lakes, reservoirs abound and are now largely naturalised within the landscape.
  • This superb pocket size book will take you on ten short circular walks to the ten best-known low fells in the Lake District The fells get their name from the Old Norse word, fjalls, which originally meant areas of rough upland grazing. Today, the Lakeland fells promise some of the best high level walking in England, and a real sense of freedom. But though the high fells often feature rocky summits, narrow edges and sheer cliffs, the lower fells, below the 2,000 foot contour, are greener, rounder and kinder. Walking on them can still be steep and strenuous, of course, but the routes are more suitable for the general walker. And the views are just as incredible.
  • Circular Walks in Wirral will take you to some of Wirral’s most peaceful and scenic corners, and outlines 17 walks exploring Wirral's finest countryside spread throughout the peninsula.
  • This handy pocket size book will take you on ten of the best short circular walks along the Ceredigion coast. Cardigan Bay embraces the dramatic sweep of the Welsh coastline, from Bardsey Island on the tip of the Llŷn in the north, to Strumble Head in Pembrokeshire in the south. It takes in parts of two National Parks: Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire, and three different counties: Gwynedd, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire. The southern half of Cardigan Bay covers the rugged coastline between Aberystwyth and Cardigan. The dramatic cliffs and hidden coves are part of the Ceredigion Coast Path: a 60 mile trail that promises stunning views and some of the best opportunities for walkers to spot maritime wildlife in Wales.
  • Twenty circular walks between Llandudno and Betws-y-Coed, in and around the beautiful Conwy Valley in eastern Snowdonia.
  • The ten routes outlined in this attractive pocket size book are amongst the very best challenging routes on the mountains of Snowdonia. Snowdonia's mountain ridges can be every bit as dramatic as the summits they connect. Some are well known classics like the Snowdon Horseshoe or Nantlle Ridge, while others are surprisingly well kept secrets like the Llech Du Spur, Gyrn Lâs Ridge or the ridges of the northern Glyderau. Created as a companion volume to the best selling 'Top 10 Mountain Walks', these little books will show you the very best that Snowdonia has to offer.
  •   This handy pocket size book will take you on short circular walks to the ten finest views and viewpoints in the Peak District. Views are why many of us venture into the hills and countryside in the first place. Nothing beats a sweeping view from a moorland edge or hill, or an arching panorama over a pleasant valley. Sometimes it’s just the simple pleasure of the patterns of light and shade, the textures and colours of the woodland or the flowing beauty of the stream we’re walking beside. But typically there’s a feeling that you’ve earned a great view through sheer effort – even if the easiest approach had been taken to reach it. Perhaps that’s why so many of the great Peak District views are atop minor summits, at moorland edges, or overlooking deep valleys.
  • Coming Soon
    This authoritative walking guide will take you to some of the very best, tried-and-tested circular walking routes across NorthWales. The book covers walks in Anglesey, the Lleyn Peninsula, Snowdonia, the Conwy Valley, the Clwydian Range, and the Vale of Llangollen.

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