•   This handy pocket size book will take you on short circular walks to the ten finest views and viewpoints in the Peak District. Views are why many of us venture into the hills and countryside in the first place. Nothing beats a sweeping view from a moorland edge or hill, or an arching panorama over a pleasant valley. Sometimes it’s just the simple pleasure of the patterns of light and shade, the textures and colours of the woodland or the flowing beauty of the stream we’re walking beside. But typically there’s a feeling that you’ve earned a great view through sheer effort – even if the easiest approach had been taken to reach it. Perhaps that’s why so many of the great Peak District views are atop minor summits, at moorland edges, or overlooking deep valleys.
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. The Isle of Anglesey offers some of the finest coastal walking in North Wales. In just over 125 miles there are dramatic sea cliffs, quiet coves, wide sandy bays, tiny fishing villages, modern resorts, coastal hills and remains from a rich maritime heritage. The walks in this book are what I consider to be the finest routes along this superb section of coast, one of the seven main sections of the wales Coast Path.  
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    This authoritative walking guide will take you to some of the very best, tried-and-tested circular walking routes across NorthWales. The book covers walks in Anglesey, the Lleyn Peninsula, Snowdonia, the Conwy Valley, the Clwydian Range, and the Vale of Llangollen.
  • The ten best circular hill walks in the area. Classic easy summits include Conic Hill, Duncryne and Ben A’an. Perfect panoramas, breathtaking views and a wealth of wildlife.
  • Walking in the Clwydian Range describes 21 circular walks spread throughout the AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty); many on the well known Offa’s Dyke Path, others in the little known country to the east of the main ridge. Some lovely walks.
  • This popular pocket size book will take you on ten short circular walks to the finest lakeside paths in the Lake District. Lakeland’s characteristic lakes and meres are a legacy of the last Ice Age when vast ice sheets scoured out deep U-shaped valleys and upland combes. Today, sixteen main lakes and scores of smaller tarns punctuate the National Park. They include England’s longest lake (Windermere: 10½ miles long), and its deepest lake (Wast Water: 243 feet deep). Only Windermere, Derwent Water, Coniston Water and Ullswater have regular steamer and ferry services, yet every lake features dramatic waterside walks that will stay in your memory forever.
  • This pretty little book gives you short circular walks to the most spectacular waterfalls in the Yorkshire Dales. Geology and the way it shapes the land have created a countryside tailor-made for the development of waterfalls. The gritstone fells and moors gather copious rainfall, which they shed along countless becks and rivers that erode the rock into twisting gills and valleys. Where localised geological conditions bring together the grits and limestones, differential erosion creates bands of resistant rocks over which the becks plunge as hidden cataracts and waterfalls, often called forces in the Yorkshire Dales. Each has its own unique form and atmosphere to discover and explore.
  • This attractive pocket size book will take you on short circular walks to the ten finest rocks and edges in the Peak District. Surprisingly for newcomers, the Peak District is almost devoid of anything resembling a traditional mountain peak (the name instead derives from the Old English paec, merely meaning ‘hill’). In reality, The Peak is a high, sloping plateau, cleft by deep valleys and winding ravines. In compensation, however, there are long runs of startlingly dramatic cliffs — here known as edges — and spectacularly weathered outcrops of rock, often referred to as tors. For rock climbers, they offer some of England’s finest challenges, while for walkers the views from the escarpments’ rims can be unforgettable.
  • This handy, pocket size book will take you on the ten best short circular walks along the Carmarthen Bay and Gower stretch of the Wales Coast Path. Carmarthen Bay embraces an area of Welsh coast stretching from south Pembrokeshire to the Gower Peninsula. Long, sandy beaches and wide, silty estuaries dominate much of the bay, though there are also high cliffs and rocky coves in places. The Gower Peninsula, at the eastern end of the bay, is a small but priceless gem. Britain’s first official Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), the peninsula contains an astonishing variety of landscapes: dunes, marshland, high cliffs, windswept downs, wooded valleys, picturesque villages and glorious sandy beaches — all linked by a superb footpath network.
  • Walks on the Lleyn Peninsula contains 16 circular walks which explore some of the finest sectoins of the coast, along with several of lleyn’s shapely hills. With distances ranging from 1.5 – 7.25 miles, all walkers are catered for – from those looking for a casual half-day walk to add colour to a hoilday, to the more ambitious who may perhaps complete two or more routes as an alternative to Snowdonia. Understandably popular.
  • This lovely pocket size book explores ten of the Peak District's most fascinating historic landscapes — from prehistoric monuments to Industrial Revolution ruins. Stone tools from Thor’s Cave indicate that man arrived in the Peak as the glaciers receded. More obvious are Bronze and Iron Age circles, burials and earthworks, as well as the scars of mineral extraction — begun by the Romans and continuing today. Some Peakland churches claim Saxon foundation, and by the Middle Ages there was an extensive network of tracks and settlements. Water powered the first industrial revolution, bringing roads, canals and railways, and in the fine country mansions, farmsteads, cottages and town houses there is a rich variety of vernacular and classic architecture.
  • This attractive pocket size book gives you the ten very best dale and valley walks in the Peak District. The White Peak is known for dramatic limestone gorges: convoluted pathways carved into its heart, where rearing pinnacles, dark caves and thundering rivers struck awe into seventeenth-century travellers. Still captivating today, they harbour rich woodland, wildflower meadows and disappearing and resurgent streams, one of the area’s strangest curiosities. Delightful Dovedale, once the haunt of the renowned anglers Izaak Walton and Charles Cotton, contrasts with Cave Dale, a gaunt, dry passage below Castleton’s Norman stronghold. But the Dark Peak has attractive valleys too, and different again is the Dane Valley, which cuts onto the Cheshire Plain from the gritstone moors.
  • WINNER OF THE OUTDOOR WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS’ GUILD’S ‘BEST GUIDEBOOK’ AWARD 2013 This attractive pocket size book features ten easy, short circular walks to the most amazing Lake District waterfalls. The dramatic waterfalls of the Lake District are mostly a by-product of the last Ice Age — the awesome result of the ancient interplay of ice and rock. Given perpetual life by the region’s high rainfall, they come thundering down from the fells in a variety of forms. No two are the same. Many carry the name ‘force’—from the old Norse foss simply meaning ‘waterfall’—a remnant of the times when Norsemen dominated these uplands. Unmissable!
  •   The Peak District abounds with cafes and tea shops offering fabulous, freshly brewed coffee and a mouthwatering variety of speciality teas. This pocket-size guide picks carefully selected cafés across the Peak District — in locations ranging from former stations to community cafés, National Trust properties to hillside farms, and bakeries on town streets to tearooms tucked down alleyways. All of them offer a great choice of often home-baked or locally sourced produce, and a pleasant place to relax after a refreshing walk. This handy pocket size book will take you on short circular walks to the ten friendliest and most fantastic cafes and tea shops in the Peak District.  
  • This lovely pocket size book describes the ten best short circular walks in the Yorkshire Dales' dales and valleys. The focus in the Yorkshire Dales tends to be on a trio of much-loved valleys: Swaledale, Wensleydale and Wharfedale. Yet, broadening the gaze, one finds other equally spellbinding valleys, such as Airedale, Ribblesdale, the Rawthey and Dentdale. To the north, the bounding valleys of the Eden and Lune stretch the beauty of the National Park into wider horizons of pastoral serenity. Here are walks for quiet enjoyment and seasonal beauty, where nature still reigns amid traditional patterns of farming practice. Solid stone barns and field walls characterise the dale bottoms; and the flora of the dales is wonderfully diverse: many a meadow retains its native herbal mix — yielding a delightful aroma at haytime.
  • A popular classic Cheshire walking book. The Sandstone Trail runs for 34 miles/55 km along Cheshire’s wooded central sandstone ridge, and is one of Northwest England’s best-known and most popular walking routes.    
  • Large-scale Ordnance Survey maps for walking Cheshire's Sandstone Trail in a handy pocket size book.

    Cheshire’s Sandstone Trail is probably the most popular middle-distance walk in Northwest England. Here, in handy, pocket size book format are all the maps you need to walk Cheshire's entire 55 kilometre/34 mile Trail.
    • Enlarged and enhanced, large scale 1:25,000 Ordnance Survey mapping for the whole Sandstone Trail
    • Up-to-date route of Sandstone Trail clearly highlighted in yellow
    • Extra map symbols for pubs, tea rooms, parking and more
    • Trail introduction and photo mosaic
    • Useful information section
    • Ideal for walkers and all outdoor enthusiasts along Cheshire's sandstone ridge
    • Contains relevant mapping from two OS maps for the price of one
     
  • The ten best circular walks exploring the area’s seawater and freshwater lochs and lochans, including lochs Lomond, Katrine, and Venachar. Stunning scenery and unusual wildlife. Featured walks include: Luss, Balloch Castle Country Park, Loch Lomond NNR, Balmaha & Milarrochy, Sallochy Wood & Dun Maoil, Along Loch Katrine, Loch Ard, Loch Katrine & Loch Arklet, Inversnaid & Loch Lomond and Loch Venachar.
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. The past two centuries have wrought more change on South Wales than any other section of the country’s coast. Until the end of the 18th century, Swansea, Barry and even Cardiff were just small ports, though their ships traded far and wide. The industry of iron and coal changed things forever but most of the coast and its immediate hinterland were left unspoiled and elsewhere, nature has reclaimed some of what was taken. The coast is one of extreme contrasts, ranging from great dune systems through sheer cliffs to miles of coastal saltmarsh. Nowhere is far from a delightful stretch overlooking the sea, with fine views, nature and heritage all around.
  •   This lovely little book contains the ten best short circular walks along the north part of the Cardigan Bay section of the Wales Coast Path Cardigan Bay embraces the dramatic sweep of the Welsh coastline, from Bardsey island on the tip of Lleyn, in the north, to Strumble Head in Pembrokeshire, in the south. It takes in parts of two National Parks: Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire, and three different counties, Gwynedd, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire. The striking northern section between Porthmadog and Borth is as varied as it is beautiful. Characterised by vast beaches and rugged cliffs, the coast offers superb walking with ever-changing views and a wealth of wildlife.
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    Dorset's best coastal pub walks

    The excellent pubs along the Dorset coast complement the walking on this superlative stretch of the South West Coast Path. Each walk incorporates a stretch of the South West Coast Path, and starts and finishes close to a superb pub. Combined they cover the very best stretches of Dorset’s coastline, one of great natural beauty and variety. The pub walks here are also ordered from west to east, starting with Lyme Regis and finishing at Studland. All the pubs are situated either right on the coast or a short distance inland — some in coves and harbours, others right on the beach — and almost every one is open all day. With the pubs open all year and the walking good in all seasons, Dorset’s iconic Jurassic Coast is a year-round destination.   
  • The hills and mountains of Snowdonia will captivate any lover of wild mountain scenery, with around 100 summits above 2,000 feet (approximately 610 metres) and fourteen exceeding 3,000 feet (914 metres). The ten classic walks in this great little guide have been chosen to give a variety of routes, spread across the entire National Park, with most of the main hill groups represented. For each mountain the most scenic route has been chosen and where possible these are well-established, classic paths, easy to follow, with good access and official parking. Enjoy Snowdonia.
  • This handy, pocket size book explores ten short circular routes on the best high fells in the Lake District. The Lakeland fells have inspired writers, artists and walkers for centuries. Like the deep valleys that separate them, they were formed by the flow and grind of ancient ice sheets. Above the 2,000-foot contour, they form a high mountain environment whose sheer cliffs, narrow edges, and exposed rocky summits demand respect. Today, this rugged upland landscape is one of the most visited hill walking areas in Britain. The high fells feature enough classic routes, challenges and captivating views to delight even the most demanding fell walker.
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    Bude to Land's End

    The ten walking routes featured here highlight the best short circular walks along the North Cornwall Coast section of the popular, 630-mile long South West Coast Path (SWCP). From Bude to the western-most tip of England at Land's End, Cornwall's northern coast has a character all its own. Much of its 140 miles is set against the open Atlantic, whose winter storms and thundering waves have sculpted a rugged coastline of formidable cliffs. Tiny, wave-washed coves and zawns contrast expansive beaches and dunes, the wild scenery often spilling offshore to half submerged reefs, stacks and rocky islands. The holiday resorts of St Ives and Newquay can attract summer crowds, but elsewhere, the coast is often deserted, with only birds for company and the delights of nature as distractions. The five-book series of 'Top Ten Walks' covers the whole of the UK's famous South West Coast Path. Each book explores the highlights along the way; showcasing its natural beauty, wildlife and heritage. Once you've tasted what the North Cornwall section has to offer, we think you'll be inspired to come back to tackle the complete trail.  

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