• When it comes to hill walking, walks with views are much more fun than those without. These walks will also take keen photographers to come of the best places in Cumbria for taking those stunning images. Viewpoints are the walkers reward: the potential grandeur of the vista or panorama from just over the next incline or the atop the next crag is the incentive that draws on weary legs to summits. With lakes, rivers, forests, woodland, rolling countryside and craggy fells all crammed into such a compact geographical area, it’s no surprise that the Lake District is full of such stunning visual rewards, with unique and beautiful views around every corner.
  • This attractive and good looking book will take you on ten short circular walks to some of the finest and most iconic pubs and inns in Pembrokeshire, in South Wales. Ever since rambling became a recognised pastime, country pubs have been magnets for walkers. Whether a lunchtime stop along the way or a final destination for the day, the promise of a thirst-quenching pint, bar snack or a hearty meal is for many, an integral part of the day. Many of Pembrokeshire's coastal inns have origins in serving seafarers, while those inland lay beside routes to and from the coast or beside old droves along which livestock were herded to market. Today, all have a fine tradition of serving visitors who come for no other purpose than to enjoy the magnificent countryside. Those chosen here have long established reputations for their food or ale and have an individual quirkiness worth seeking out.
  • This photogenic book will take you on ten short circular walks along the northern part of the Pembrokeshire section of the Wales Coast Path. Pembrokeshire’s north coast has a rugged and remote quality, reflecting the wildness of the hills that rise behind. It was largely ignored during the Norman colonisation and even today beyond St Dogmael’s there are only a handful of coastal communities. Yet burial cairns, promontory forts and a pre-historic trackway across the Preseli Hills indicate widespread prehistoric settlement, and it was an important focus during the spread of Celtic Christianity. Fishing, farming and stock grazing were traditional ways of life, but the Industrial Revolution briefly opened coastal quarrying and the railway made Fishguard an important Irish port. Today, it is a relative backwater but the coast has an untamed beauty, its flowers, birds, seals and porpoises making it a truly special place.
  • This pocket size book explores the ten best short circular waterside walks in the Peak District. Some follow lovely stretches of rivers; others explore the northern reservoirs. Several major rivers originate in the Peak, fed by countless springs, brooks and streams that have cut deep cloughs and gorges through the grit and limestone. Many powered the early industrialisation of the area while the valleys often served as conduits for trans-Pennine trade. Other dales, too steep or narrow for settlement or farming, or whose streams found subterranean courses, were ignored and today provide valuable wildlife habitats. And although the region has no significant natural lakes, reservoirs abound and are now largely naturalised within the landscape.
  • This superb pocket size book will take you on ten short circular walks to the ten best-known low fells in the Lake District The fells get their name from the Old Norse word, fjalls, which originally meant areas of rough upland grazing. Today, the Lakeland fells promise some of the best high level walking in England, and a real sense of freedom. But though the high fells often feature rocky summits, narrow edges and sheer cliffs, the lower fells, below the 2,000 foot contour, are greener, rounder and kinder. Walking on them can still be steep and strenuous, of course, but the routes are more suitable for the general walker. And the views are just as incredible.
  • This handy pocket size book will take you on ten of the best short circular walks along the Ceredigion coast. Cardigan Bay embraces the dramatic sweep of the Welsh coastline, from Bardsey Island on the tip of the Llŷn in the north, to Strumble Head in Pembrokeshire in the south. It takes in parts of two National Parks: Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire, and three different counties: Gwynedd, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire. The southern half of Cardigan Bay covers the rugged coastline between Aberystwyth and Cardigan. The dramatic cliffs and hidden coves are part of the Ceredigion Coast Path: a 60 mile trail that promises stunning views and some of the best opportunities for walkers to spot maritime wildlife in Wales.
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. The Isle of Anglesey offers some of the finest coastal walking in North Wales. In just over 125 miles there are dramatic sea cliffs, quiet coves, wide sandy bays, tiny fishing villages, modern resorts, coastal hills and remains from a rich maritime heritage. The walks in this book are what I consider to be the finest routes along this superb section of coast, one of the seven main sections of the wales Coast Path.  
  • This attractive pocket size book will take you on short circular walks to the ten finest rocks and edges in the Peak District. Surprisingly for newcomers, the Peak District is almost devoid of anything resembling a traditional mountain peak (the name instead derives from the Old English paec, merely meaning ‘hill’). In reality, The Peak is a high, sloping plateau, cleft by deep valleys and winding ravines. In compensation, however, there are long runs of startlingly dramatic cliffs — here known as edges — and spectacularly weathered outcrops of rock, often referred to as tors. For rock climbers, they offer some of England’s finest challenges, while for walkers the views from the escarpments’ rims can be unforgettable.
  • This handy, pocket size book will take you on the ten best short circular walks along the Carmarthen Bay and Gower stretch of the Wales Coast Path. Carmarthen Bay embraces an area of Welsh coast stretching from south Pembrokeshire to the Gower Peninsula. Long, sandy beaches and wide, silty estuaries dominate much of the bay, though there are also high cliffs and rocky coves in places. The Gower Peninsula, at the eastern end of the bay, is a small but priceless gem. Britain’s first official Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), the peninsula contains an astonishing variety of landscapes: dunes, marshland, high cliffs, windswept downs, wooded valleys, picturesque villages and glorious sandy beaches — all linked by a superb footpath network.
  • This popular pocket size book will take you on ten short circular walks to the finest lakeside paths in the Lake District. Lakeland’s characteristic lakes and meres are a legacy of the last Ice Age when vast ice sheets scoured out deep U-shaped valleys and upland combes. Today, sixteen main lakes and scores of smaller tarns punctuate the National Park. They include England’s longest lake (Windermere: 10½ miles long), and its deepest lake (Wast Water: 243 feet deep). Only Windermere, Derwent Water, Coniston Water and Ullswater have regular steamer and ferry services, yet every lake features dramatic waterside walks that will stay in your memory forever.
  • This pretty little book gives you short circular walks to the most spectacular waterfalls in the Yorkshire Dales. Geology and the way it shapes the land have created a countryside tailor-made for the development of waterfalls. The gritstone fells and moors gather copious rainfall, which they shed along countless becks and rivers that erode the rock into twisting gills and valleys. Where localised geological conditions bring together the grits and limestones, differential erosion creates bands of resistant rocks over which the becks plunge as hidden cataracts and waterfalls, often called forces in the Yorkshire Dales. Each has its own unique form and atmosphere to discover and explore.
  • This attractive pocket size book gives you the ten very best dale and valley walks in the Peak District. The White Peak is known for dramatic limestone gorges: convoluted pathways carved into its heart, where rearing pinnacles, dark caves and thundering rivers struck awe into seventeenth-century travellers. Still captivating today, they harbour rich woodland, wildflower meadows and disappearing and resurgent streams, one of the area’s strangest curiosities. Delightful Dovedale, once the haunt of the renowned anglers Izaak Walton and Charles Cotton, contrasts with Cave Dale, a gaunt, dry passage below Castleton’s Norman stronghold. But the Dark Peak has attractive valleys too, and different again is the Dane Valley, which cuts onto the Cheshire Plain from the gritstone moors.
  • WINNER OF THE OUTDOOR WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS’ GUILD’S ‘BEST GUIDEBOOK’ AWARD 2013 This attractive pocket size book features ten easy, short circular walks to the most amazing Lake District waterfalls. The dramatic waterfalls of the Lake District are mostly a by-product of the last Ice Age — the awesome result of the ancient interplay of ice and rock. Given perpetual life by the region’s high rainfall, they come thundering down from the fells in a variety of forms. No two are the same. Many carry the name ‘force’—from the old Norse foss simply meaning ‘waterfall’—a remnant of the times when Norsemen dominated these uplands. Unmissable!
  • The ten best circular walks exploring the area’s seawater and freshwater lochs and lochans, including lochs Lomond, Katrine, and Venachar. Stunning scenery and unusual wildlife. Featured walks include: Luss, Balloch Castle Country Park, Loch Lomond NNR, Balmaha & Milarrochy, Sallochy Wood & Dun Maoil, Along Loch Katrine, Loch Ard, Loch Katrine & Loch Arklet, Inversnaid & Loch Lomond and Loch Venachar.
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    Dorset's best coastal pub walks

    The excellent pubs along the Dorset coast complement the walking on this superlative stretch of the South West Coast Path. Each walk incorporates a stretch of the South West Coast Path, and starts and finishes close to a superb pub. Combined they cover the very best stretches of Dorset’s coastline, one of great natural beauty and variety. The pub walks here are also ordered from west to east, starting with Lyme Regis and finishing at Studland. All the pubs are situated either right on the coast or a short distance inland — some in coves and harbours, others right on the beach — and almost every one is open all day. With the pubs open all year and the walking good in all seasons, Dorset’s iconic Jurassic Coast is a year-round destination.   
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. The past two centuries have wrought more change on South Wales than any other section of the country’s coast. Until the end of the 18th century, Swansea, Barry and even Cardiff were just small ports, though their ships traded far and wide. The industry of iron and coal changed things forever but most of the coast and its immediate hinterland were left unspoiled and elsewhere, nature has reclaimed some of what was taken. The coast is one of extreme contrasts, ranging from great dune systems through sheer cliffs to miles of coastal saltmarsh. Nowhere is far from a delightful stretch overlooking the sea, with fine views, nature and heritage all around.
  •   This lovely little book contains the ten best short circular walks along the north part of the Cardigan Bay section of the Wales Coast Path Cardigan Bay embraces the dramatic sweep of the Welsh coastline, from Bardsey island on the tip of Lleyn, in the north, to Strumble Head in Pembrokeshire, in the south. It takes in parts of two National Parks: Snowdonia and Pembrokeshire, and three different counties, Gwynedd, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire. The striking northern section between Porthmadog and Borth is as varied as it is beautiful. Characterised by vast beaches and rugged cliffs, the coast offers superb walking with ever-changing views and a wealth of wildlife.
  • Here in one pocket size book are ten, easy, short circular walks to the finest Lake District pubs. The words ‘Lakeland’ and ‘pub’ go together like ‘bread’ and ‘butter’ or ‘Romeo’ and ‘Juliet’. The Lake District is a region that’s famed for its traditional inns and cosy, friendly village pubs almost as much as it’s famed for its magnificent walking country. So, what could be better than combining the two—enjoying a pint of local ale half-way through a gorgeous Sunday stroll, or a hearty meal at the end of a day’s hiking?
  • Product Description One of nine books in the new Top 10 Walks: Wales Coast Path series. This attractive and cleverly structured guidebook gives walkers the ten best walks on the southern part of the South Wales Coast section of the Wales Coast Path, in a popular pocketable format. With clear information, an overview and introduction for each walk, expertly written numbered directions, Ordnance Survey maps, superb, eye-grabbing panoramic photographs, and interpretation of points of interest along the way, these guides set a new standard in clarity, appeal and ease-of-use. Contents The Wales Coast Path: an introduction Top Ten Walks: Wales Coast Path: North Wales Coast: a photo mosaic
    1. Holywell & Basinwerk Abbey
    2. Talacre & Gronant dunes
    3. Prestatyn to Graig Fawr
    4. Rhyl to Rhuddlan Castle
    5. Little Orme
    6. Around the Great Orme
    7. Conwy Mountain
    8. Above Penmaenmawr
    9. Aber Falls
    10. Lafan Sands - low/high loop
    Useful Information  
  • The Lakeland Fells have some of the finest ridge walks in the country. Exploring these ridges offers fell walking at its most satisfying — staying high, taking in several summits and enjoying the spectacular settings. Many of the Lake District’s ridge walks have become classics, like the grassy edges of the Fairfield and Kentmere Horseshoes, or rocky aretes of Striding Edge and Swirral Edge and the aptly named Sharp Edge of Blencathra.
  • Cheshire’s Sandstone Trail is probably the most popular middle-distance walk in Northwest England. The Trail runs for 55 kilometres/34 miles along Cheshire’s beautiful and varied central sandstone ridge between Frodsham and Whitchurch, just over the border in Shropshire. This cleverly structured and well designed guidebook gives walkers the ten best short circular walks along the length of the Sandstone Trail in a handy, pocketable format.
  • This lovely little book will take you on short circular walks to some of the Yorkshire Dales' most distinctive pubs and inns. The pubs of the Yorkshire Dales reflect both the area and the local people: occasionally gritty and challenging, sometimes uncompromising but essentially hugely welcoming and full of character. Some of England’s best watering holes stand here beside country lanes and village greens as they have for centuries past, gathering and exuding that unique amalgam which defines a pub. The flagged floors, the winter fires, the lamplight pooling onto lanes through bottle-glass windows, the quirky bars; that happy jigsaw of time and place which makes rambling to and between them one of life’s great pleasures.
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    Minehead to Bude

    The ten walking routes featured here highlight the best short circular walks along the Somerset and North Devon Coast section of the popular, 630-mile long South West Coast Path (SWCP). Exmoor's fringe of majestic cliffs, secluded coves, ragged wave-washed rocks and rich coastal woodland is a stunning prelude to the long distance trail. Further west are Devon's glorious beaches but also an ever-more rugged coastline, which curves to the battering Atlantic surf. Large settlements are few, but occasional picturesque hamlets and villages grew around coves and small landings where fishing and seaborne trade (not always above board) supplemented the traditional farming way of life of the hinterland. Nature complements the intrinsic beauty of this landscape; seabirds abound on the cliffs and shore, while the lush and sometimes rare flora of unspoiled cliffs, native woodland, rough pasture and dunes supports smaller birds and countless butterflies. The five-book series of 'Top Ten Walks' covers the whole of the UK's famous South West Coast Path. Each book explores the highlights along the way; showcasing its natural beauty, wildlife and heritage. Once you've experienced what the Somerset and North Devon section has to offer, we think you'll be inspired to come back to tackle the complete trail.  
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    Bude to Land's End

    The ten walking routes featured here highlight the best short circular walks along the North Cornwall Coast section of the popular, 630-mile long South West Coast Path (SWCP). From Bude to the western-most tip of England at Land's End, Cornwall's northern coast has a character all its own. Much of its 140 miles is set against the open Atlantic, whose winter storms and thundering waves have sculpted a rugged coastline of formidable cliffs. Tiny, wave-washed coves and zawns contrast expansive beaches and dunes, the wild scenery often spilling offshore to half submerged reefs, stacks and rocky islands. The holiday resorts of St Ives and Newquay can attract summer crowds, but elsewhere, the coast is often deserted, with only birds for company and the delights of nature as distractions. The five-book series of 'Top Ten Walks' covers the whole of the UK's famous South West Coast Path. Each book explores the highlights along the way; showcasing its natural beauty, wildlife and heritage. Once you've tasted what the North Cornwall section has to offer, we think you'll be inspired to come back to tackle the complete trail.  

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